Baking Material Channels with Octane Render for Cinema 4D

Baking Material Channels with Octane Render for Cinema 4D

An excerpt from “What’s New in Octane Render v3.x”

Baking is the process of transferring details from one model to another. This technique allows us to approximate the surface properties of a high-resolution geometry with a single texture map. So what we usually do is consolidate a procedural texture and/or various Cinema 4D material channels as an image. As a result, we simplify the number of assets we depend on.

The way Octane handles texture baking is a via a dedicated camera type called “Bake”. In contrast to “Thin Lens”, this mode does not render a perspective view but a flat, two-dimensional plane. This represents a typical UV coordinate space that houses the unfolded geometry with the associated material data projected on top of it. Next, we need to export (bake) this layout as a texture map. The final step involves UV mapping the resulting image, back onto the respective 3D object.

In conclusion, the goal of texture baking is to take high-res geometry and approximate it with meshes that export faster and are more suitable for real-time rendering.

Baking Material Channels with Octane Render for Cinema 4D

Material Channels (Diffuse, Roughness, Bump) – Procedural. Ms/sec: 85, Time: 01:55 min.

Baking Material Channels with Octane Render for Cinema 4D

Material Channels (Diffuse, Roughness, Bump) – Baked. Ms/sec: 280, Time: 00:43 min.

Baking Material Channels with Octane Render for Cinema 4D

Material Channels (Diffuse, Roughness, Bump) – Procedural. Light Source: Area Light. Ms/sec: 170, Time: 01:00 min.

Baking Material Channels with Octane Render for Cinema 4D

Material Channels (Diffuse, Roughness, Bump) – Baked. Light Source: None. Ms/sec: 950, Time: 00:15 min.


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